Books on Monday – Free Motion Meandering

Today we are looking at Free-Motion Meandering: A Beginners Guide to Machine Quilting by Angela Walters. It is available for Kindle as well as in paperback and the second link below is to the Kindle version. Both links are, as usual, Amazon Affiliate links that help support this blog.

This book was one of my quilty Christmas gifts, and my original plan was to post a review with photos of me trying these things out. That was before a bout of a cold hit and operating heavy machinery became a terrible idea. (Rotary cutters too, actually so only hand quilting has happened over the last day or so.) So you are getting the review, but not the demo pics. I think you’ll survive.

One could argue that there should come a point when one should stop buying/reading free motion quilting books and just do it. (This might have been one of the reasons that I was going to actually do some before writing this review!) However, the whole idea of just covering meanders of various kinds was one of the things that drew me to this book. I like the idea of just looking at one style of quilting at a time.

If you’ve ever read one of Angela Walters’s other books, you are already acquainted with her light (and relaxing) tone. This book is no exception. She definitely puts me at ease with her “you can do this” tone of writing.

The book starts with an Introduction and then a section called “Why Meanders?” (This seemed like a very good question to me!) Then she moves on to a few basics of how to get started followed by a section called “First Stitches” that includes a few Frequently Asked Questions. Then it’s on to the various types of meanders she covers in the book. These are: the Basic Meander and the Loopy Meander (the two that I usually think of when the word meander comes to mind), the Swirl Meander, the Swirl Hook Meander, the Paisley Meander, the Leafy Meander and the Feather Meander (yes, I know, I don’t normally think of feathers as a meander but I can see how these are kind of). Her last section is Improv Quilting, which combines the previous designs. Each section has a few FAQs at the end of it, which I find very helpful.

I will admit that this is the second machine quilting book that has made me want to jump right in and get started. (The first was Walk.) I’m not sure why that is, but I’m pretty sure that within the next few weeks you will see some samples of meandering on this blog. Angela’s approach seems to be what I needed to get inspired and brave enough to try.

Quilt on!